David Elsewhere: Kollaboration 4

David ElsewhereJetzt weiss ich, wie der Typ aus dem Robots-Dance heisst: David „Elsewhere“ Bernal.

Scheint eine „kleine“ Berühmtheit nach der Tanzeinlage geworden zu sein. Sogar die Wikipedia hat einen Eintrag über ihn. Er hat mittlerweile bei einigen Spots für Heineken, Volkswagen (kennen sicherlich noch einige.. „dancing in the rain“), iPod (.mov), und 7-Eleven mitmachen können.

Eine andere Seite schreibt über ihn (+Interview):

The first time I saw David „€œElsewhere“€? Bernal dance I thought I was watching some kind of doctored video clip that had been enhanced with special effects. It was a clip I received via email of David performing at a dance event. The clip“€”one of the most widely circulated Internet video clips in recent history“€”shows one of David“€™s memorable performances at an event called Kollaboration. David gets up on stage like an innocent kid wearing a dorky orange sweathshirt and tight jeans. At first glance he looks like someone that has as much rhythm as an 80-year-old grandma. He starts dancing like a total amateur, but before you know it, Shazam! [hehe, stimmt, ging mir ebenso] He“€™s busting out with jaw-dropping, out-of-this-world moves that make him seem like he“€™s part human, part rubber band. The crowd goes wild as David dishes out one mind-bending move after another. It“€™s obvious that David believes in pushing the envelope. He puts few limits on what his dancing should incorporate or be defined as. He puts even fewer limits on what his body should be able to do. It is this creativity and open-mindedness that set him apart from your typical breakdancer and pop-locker“€” and which has quickly made David one of the most popular dancers on the B-boy scene.

Eigentlich wollte ich ja nur ein weiteres Video auf YouTube mit David zur Kollaboration 4 vorstellen.

Aber das war es nicht, was mich dazu gebracht hat, mehr über diesen Menschen zu schreiben. Es war diese Antwort (aus o.g. Interview), die mich gecatcht hat… ich nenne es Spirit:

You were recently on the Jay Leno, Jimmy Kimmel, and Steve Harvey shows, so it seems like now that you don“€™t put as much time into it is when you“€™re getting bigger publicity?
It“€™s very ironic. Now that I“€™m kind of settled down all these gigs are coming up. It“€™s not upsetting though. These gigs are cool and all, but I really don“€™t see it happening forever. I never really expect mainstream society and the media to take what I do seriously. I think the reason I“€™m getting a lot of gigs now is because it“€™s something new. It“€™s something different. People are used to seeing the regular styles of breakdancing, but then when something a little bit different comes along it“€™s like, wow! After a while people will know who I am, and then I“€™ll be old news. The thing about dancing is that it takes so long to develop these styles and moves. I“€™ve been dancing for eight years, and I“€™ve experimented for countless hours. Some of these moves have taken me years to perfect, but they only take a few seconds to perform. And then if people see one of your moves a couple of times they say it“€™s old. Talk about a lot of work for not that much pay off. Dancing is for people that want to do it for the love of it.

btw, ist das mit dem Blogging genauso? „Blogging is for people that want to do it for the love of it

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Über den Autor

Robert Basic

Robert Basic ist Namensgeber und Gründer von BASIC thinking und hat die Seite 2009 abgegeben. Von 2004 bis 2009 hat er über 12.000 Artikel hier veröffentlicht.

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